Monday, February 15, 2016

War of 1812 Generals

Brits left and centre, Yank to the right.
Last post this week is another lot of leftovers from AHPCV, in the form of three generals for my War of 1812 project.  There are two British (the good guys) and one American (boo, hiss, Yankee go home).  All are Perry's, from the British Napoleonic range.





I really like these three figs, good poses on the riders and fine looking horse flesh underneath.  The one officer in the navy coat has been initially allocated to the staunch defenders of Upper Canada.  However, uniform similarities and the top coat mean that he could end up leading our brutish southern neighbours bent on  conquest rape and pillage.








Once again I used slightly different basing techniques.  To suite the rough Canadian Shield I made the ground quite rocky, using a mix of ballast and Kitty litter.  I then added tufts for weeds to suit my mood at the time.

10 comments:

  1. Great stuff Peter - I think you've caught the essence of the dastardly Americans right there. I look forward to seeing Canada bravest sons best them on the battlefield.

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    1. Dastardly about covers it Conrad. Thanks.

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  2. Nice work, Peter. A fine tribute to oft forgotten period of US history.

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  3. Splendid chaps Peter, even the slovenly American. ;)

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    1. Thanks Michael. Every good story needs a villain!

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  4. They look beautiful, nice job!

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  5. The only possible response:

    In 1814 we took a little trip
    Along with Colonel Jackson down the mighty Mississippi
    We took a little bacon and we took a little beans
    And we caught the bloody British in the town of New Orleans

    We fired our guns and the British kept a-comin'
    There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago
    We fired once more and they began to runnin'
    On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

    We looked down the river and we seed the British come
    And there must have been a hundred of 'em beatin' on the drum
    They stepped so high and they made their bugles ring
    We stood behind our cotton bales and didn't say a thing

    We fired our guns and the British kept a-comin'
    There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago
    We fired once more and they began to runnin'
    On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

    Old Hickory said we could take 'em by surprise
    If we didn't fire our muskets 'till we looked 'em in the eyes
    We held our fire 'till we seed their faces well
    Then we opened up our squirrel guns and gave 'em
    Well, we

    Fired our guns and the British kept a-comin'
    There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago
    We fired once more and they began to runnin'
    On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

    eah they ran through the briers and they ran through the brambles
    And they ran through the bushes where a rabbit couldn't go
    They ran so fast that the hounds couldn't catch 'em
    On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

    We fired our cannon 'till the barrel melted down
    So we grabbed an alligator and we fought another round
    We filled his head with cannonballs 'n' powdered his behind
    And when we touched the powder off, the gator lost his mind

    We fired our guns and the British kept a-comin'
    There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago
    We fired once more and they began to runnin'
    On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

    Yeah they ran through the briers and they ran through the brambles
    And they ran through the bushes where a rabbit couldn't go
    They ran so fast that the hounds couldn't catch 'em
    On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

    Hut, hut, three, four
    Sound off, three, four
    Hut, hut, three, four
    Sound off, three, four
    Hut, hut, three, four

    Johnny Horton - The Battle Of New Orleans

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    1. It's a fine tune Stu, and no more inaccurate than most American history!

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